Victim

Victim of discrimination

 

 What does it mean to experience discrimination?

You are, because of your nationality, skin colour, ancestry or national or ethnic origin more poorly treated than another person.

  • For example:
    • Because of your origin or skin colour, you are not allowed into a nightclub.
    • You are not hired for a certain position because of your origin or skin colour.
  • Discrimination can be direct or indirect (for more info on Unia’s website)

What can you do?

You can report the discrimination to Unia.

Unia is an independent public institution which combats discrimination and promotes equal opportunities. It has interfederal competence, meaning that, in Belgium, Unia has the authority to act at the federal level as well as at the level of the regions and communities.

You can contact Unia via different channels:

  • online (see reporting)
  • via e-mail: [email protected]
  • by telephone: Monday to Friday, 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and 1:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. via the toll-free phone number 0800 12 800 (from
  • Belgium) or +32 (0)2 212 30 00 (from abroad)
  • by post: Unia, Rue Royale 138, 1000 Brussels
  • via a local contact point

You can also contact Unia to ask a question: online, by telephone or via email (see above).

To learn more about what happens after you report an incident, visit Unia’s website.

Victim of racially-motivated hate speech

 

What is it?

Hate speech means speech that incites hatred, violence or discrimination. Racially-motivated hate speech intentionally incites discrimination, hatred or violence towards a person or a group based on one of the five “racial” criteria: so-called race, skin colour, nationality, ancestry and national or ethnic origin.

What can you do?

You have certainly already come across hateful or racist comments on the internet. Many people try to ignore these messages, yet addressing them would be better. Combating these hateful comments together means helping to prevent hate from becoming the norm.

On its website, Unia lists the possible actions you can take: 

Victim of a racially-motivated hate crime

 

What is it?

Hate crimes are criminal acts that are committed on the basis of a discriminatory thought. We refer to a hate crime when one of the reasons motivating the perpetrator is related to a characteristic – whether supposed or real – of the victim, such as for example nationality, skin colour, ancestry or national or ethnic origin.

Hate crimes are different from other crimes: the victim is attacked because he or she belongs to a specific group. The perpetrator often seeks to intimidate not only an individual, but also an entire group. A hate crime can be physical or psychological, verbal or sexual: the goal is always to control the other person, to dominate him or her. Intimidating behaviour (intimidations, blocking movement, etc.) can also be considered an act of violence.

The act of violence can occur in the private sphere, such as the home, or in a public setting, such as the workplace, in the street, etc.

What can you do?

  • In case of an emergency, immediately dial the toll-free number 101.
  • Memorise as many details as possible (time, place, license plate, etc.).
  • Gather the names and telephone numbers of witnesses.
  • Report to the nearest police station, or any other police station, as quickly as possible. If possible, ask someone you trust to accompany you. If you are the victim, the police is the first service you must contact, even if you do not know the identity of the perpetrator.
  • It is in your interest to file a complaint as quickly as possible either with the nearest police station or any other police station. This will allow the police to have specific information at its disposal, in particular the time, place, and description of the suspect, or any damages you suffered. If you are afraid to file a complaint immediately you can do so at a later date by sending a written complaint to the police. This written complaint must include a precise description of the incident and mention the place where it occurred, the date and time, the context, the presence of witnesses, if any, and, if possible, the identity of the presumed perpetrator(s).
  • See a doctor (general practitioner, emergency department) to have your injuries officially recorded and to obtain a medical certificate.
  • Report a hate crime to Unia: Unia is an independent public institution which combats discrimination and promotes equal opportunities. It has interfederal competence, meaning that, in Belgium, Unia has the authority to act at the federal level as well as at the level of the regions and communities.

You can contact Unia via different channels:

  • online (see reporting)
  • via e-mail: [email protected]
  • by telephone: Monday to Friday, 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and 1:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. via the toll-free phone number 0800 12 800 (from
  • Belgium) or +32 (0)2 212 30 00 (from abroad)
  • by post: Unia, Rue Royale 138, 1000 Brussels
  • via a local contact point

You can also contact Unia to ask a question: online, by telephone or via email (see above).

To learn more about what happens after you report an incident, visit Unia’s website.

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